iea

Nov 132017

This week we had Rochester printmaker Adam Werth joining us for a week long residency where he really put our facilities to the test. Adam used his tradition printmaking background and combined it with the new technologies at the IEA to create aquatint plates using a polymer spray on zinc and then engraving the image with our laser. He also spent time creating a large body of new work with our digital printer, and chose to really play with the intense colors that are created from purely digital imagery.

Sep 042017

We were lucky to have Phillip Stearns with us this week. Phillip produces both physical and intangible works, performances, and experiences using electronic media. His practice spans several disciplines from creative coding and physical computing to interactive light and sound installations, computational weaving to performances using light and sound.

During his residency here Phillip experimented with multiple processes including metal patinas that he attempted to etch with our laser cutter.

Here are a few images from his residency, he also did an Instagram takeover to document his process that you can see by following us @alfred_iea.

Quick results with vinegar and different salts. Boric acid is strong stuff!

Combining two projects – Visualizing conflict zones with Z-fighting from “Year of the glitch” and DEM imagery I started working with during my residency at @hsduesseldorf earlier this year.

Sep 022017

The IEA has an Instagram account! Follow us at @alfred_iea to stay posted on current and upcoming artists, events, sneak peeks into our archive, and artist IG takeovers.

Still from processed video

The IEA was joined by Tammy McGovern, of Buffalo, NY, as our artist in residence over the week of June 26th. Tammy, who holds a BA in media study from SUNY Buffalo, has shown her film, video, installation, and interactive works in venues at Hallwalls, Visual Studies Workshop, and the Malaysian Institute of Art, among others. Her interactive works are viewer driven experiences that combine aspects of static collage and cinematic stimulation. Pulling from sources varying from poetic texts to manipulated samples from game shows, Tammy’s work becomes an interactive experiment exploring the grey areas among a viewer’s desires, creations, and readings.

Throughout her week at the IEA, Tammy worked across the image processing tools in the IEA’s video studio to process her own video work and stock video to produce new recordings. The various functions of the Doupfer coupled with the MVIP were used to manipulate the properties of these videos along with the warping and transitional effects of Vizzie software and the 4k mixer. The resulting work comes in the form of colorful, flickering, warping videos which will see future life in Tammy’s web based art works.

Below are images from Tammy residency:

Tammy at helm of video studio

Tammy at helm of video studio

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Intaglio print

The IEA welcomed Catherine Miller, of Williamsville, NY, as our artist in residence over the week of June 19th. Catherine, who received her MFA in from SUNY Buffalo, focuses on the maze as a symbol in much of her work. Inspired by the challenges foreign refugees face, the maze serves as an analogy to the trials of navigating various bureaucratic systems and legal and personal challenges to reach political asylum in the United States. She works with Mylar for her drawings and, for her print work, constructs etchings with multiple plates consisting of silk collagraphs, solar, carbordum and relief plates. This process of color sequencing and reordering plates produces one of a kind prints that organically produce the maze like designs she explores in her work.

During her residency, Catherine worked across laser etched wood block and acrylic plates, photo polymer, and digital prints to produce works from her maze design series. These varied in size from 12 x 18″ up to 48 x 48″ and on various papers and presses. The stand out were the polymer plate prints, which nearly mirrored the hand drawn quality of the drawings that served as their source material. Catherine brought all of her blocks and plates with her back to WIlliamsville and intends to further work on these prints in the coming months.

Below are images from Catherine’s residency

Laser cut wood blocks and digital printing in progress

Laser cut wood blocks and digital printing in progress

Catherine preparing a photo polymer plate for printing

Catherine preparing a photo polymer plate for printing

Intaglio print

Intaglio print

Relief Print

Relief Print

Photo-polymer print

Photo-polymer print

Digital Print

Digital Print

Digital Print

Digital Print

Digital Print (before water bath processing)

The IEA was joined by Bob Erickson from Piseco, NY, for an artist residency over the week of June 12th. Bob, who received his MFA from Illinois State University in 1987 and has work in permanent collections of over twenty national and international galleries and museums, finds inspiration for his work from the world around him in the Northern Adirondack Mountains of New York State. In his North series, Bob captures captures the big and the small and removes the scale, creating images where the image could be a pile of sticks or the view of the sky through the tree line with no way to distinguish between the two. While the images look abstract at first, a closer inspection reveals tells of the source material through the earthly tones and mottled backgrounds that hint to the tree branches, mosses, and rocky outcroppings from which his images are derived.

During his residency, Bob spread his time across stone litho, photo polymer, acrylic plate, and digital printing with imagery from his North series. Besides widespread use of nearly every press and technique available in the shop, Bob’s most ambitious project was his treatment of the digital prints. Bob prepared a bath with sediment, dyes, and washes and set the digital prints he produced into these baths to absorb impurities as well as have the sediment stick to the surface once the paper was retrieved from the bath. This technique resulted in prints that looked both digitally produced and hand made at the same time.

Below are some images from Bob’s residency:

Various prints and tests including stone litho and polymer plate prints

Various prints and tests including stone litho and polymer plate prints

Bob (right) with print technical specialist Tim Pauszek examining a polymer plate print

Bob (right) with print technical specialist Tim Pauszek examining a polymer plate print

Drying digital prints given the water bath treatment as described above

Drying digital prints given the water bath treatment as described above

Photo Polymer Print

Photo Polymer Print

Stone Litho Print

Stone Litho Print

Digital Print (before water bath processing)

Digital Print (before water bath processing)

River Rat

The IEA welcomed Donald Hải Phú Daedalus from Bronx, NY, for an artist residency over the week of June 5th, 2017. Donald, who received his MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute, invents tools to arrive at new ideas for his work. These can be workflows, physical instruments, or methodologies and may aid in creating a project, be the project in of itself, or lead to new works altogether. With the theme of suspicion throughout his work, second guessing what he hears, sees, and reads, Donald creates work in sculpture, video, and artist books to test the authenticity of the world around him.

During his residency Donald spent is time across two branches of his ongoing Illinois River Project work. The first was further editing a video piece already in progress which focuses on the methods of cleaning the water and soil around the Illinois river which involves studies for high levels of lead in the areas that often see residential areas butted up to industrial areas, the technologies surrounding extraction and use of bone meal from invasive carp species to help remediate the soil in these areas, and the culture that has developed around this almost ceremonial expeditions to catch these carp. Additionally, Donald printed and bound an artist book titled Waging on Aging Centurions, which took the form of a 754 page stab-bound book with themes of the artist’s travels and his train of thoughts and ideas while moving through these locations.

Below are some images from Donald’s residency

Illinois River Project - River Rat

Illinois River Project - River Rat

Waging on Aging Centurions – Bridges

Waging on Aging Centurions – Bridges

Waging on Aging Centurions – Highline

Waging on Aging Centurions – Highline

Waging on Aging Centurions – Another Atlantic City

Waging on Aging Centurions – Another Atlantic City

Waging on Aging Centurions – 6 1/2 Avenue

Waging on Aging Centurions – 6 1/2 Avenue

Waging on Aging Centurions – South Beach

Waging on Aging Centurions – South Beach

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The IEA was joined by Blake Marques Carrington for an artist residency over the week of May 22nd. Based in Brooklyn, NY, Blake holds an MFA from Syracuse University and works across a wide range of media including digital printmaking, audiovisual compositions, live visuals to accompany performances, and video installation user self produced custom software – all falling a heading he calls “Speculative Forensics”. Focusing on the question “can information be lost?” Blake often translates his creations from one medium to another, asking the question of how accurately it could possibly return its original form.

During his residency, Blake spent the majority of his time with the Doupfer synthesizers, creating entirely new works as well as mixing and processing his own tracks through the inputs on these instruments. Blake brought in in own recordings and made new recordings here including making use of a prepared piano which happened to be in the studios. These recordings will be mixed for a new album Blake is currently producing as well as used in future performances and collaborations.

Blake at work in the studio

Blake at work in the studio

“Angels + Noise” 30 second sample (work in progress).

Images from Super-8 tapes being used for Renate's book

The IEA welcomed Renate Ferro as our artist in residence over the week of May 15th. A Professor of Visual Arts at Cornell University, Renate frames herself as a conceptual artist who toggles between the creative skins of old and new technologies. These are actualized through forms such as installation, interactive net-based projects, digital time-based media, drawing, and text. Often engaging with the concepts of memory and disclosure, Renate’s practice conjoins the making of art out of life’s materials and life’s materials out of art, blending the tactile material world with the networked, immaterial world.

During her residency, Renate explored her archive of video work from her Super 8 film and early low-resolution digital video projections, which she had previously experimented with image making from these sources on older technology via printing on various substrates with dot matrix printers. At the IEA she began work on an artist book derived from these images using our large format printers to print on heavy stock Japanese papers. These prints will ultimately become pages of a small edition of books to be stab bound at a later date.

Below is a selection of images from Renate’s time at the IEA.

Renate working with IEA Co-Director Joseph Scheer on new prints

Renate working with IEA Co-Director Joseph Scheer on new prints

Color Tests

Color Tests

Renate speaking with IEA Co-Director Peer Bode about her new series

Renate speaking with IEA Co-Director Peer Bode about her new series

Renate speaking with recent EIA graduate Jessica Earle about her thesis book

Renate speaking with recent EIA graduate Jessica Earle about her thesis book

Images from Super-8 tapes being used for Renate's book

Images from Super-8 tapes being used for Renate's book

Video Still

The IEA hosted Zorica Colić as a resident artist over the week of May 8th, 2017. Zorica’s work researches how contemporary life is structured and manipulated, with particular emphasis on the implications of the biopolitical management of human life. Through various hybridized forms of display, her works explore the complex relationships between politics, art and consumer worlds, examining how our lives are regulated or defined by taste, by products, and by mass-distributed role models. The goal is to identify new ways to subvert normative mass culture in order to re-contextualize images and signs that have become inflated from over-proliferation.

Throughout her residency, Zorica focused on a new series of work spinning off from her series titled Well-beings. In this new series, Zorica shot video as well as still images of different parts of her body while assuming yoga poses. These clips were then cut up, fragmented, and recombined, in a similar manner as Well-beings, to create figures in these poses with various textures derived from other parts of her body with a lean to grotesque textures and forms. Zorica intends to further process this media in her own studio.

Below are images from Zorica’s residency:

Recording Setup

Recording Setup

Zorica working with IEA co-director Joseph Scheer on video images

Zorica working with IEA co-director Joseph Scheer on video images

During her residency Zorica also explored some print work using her video images

During her residency Zorica also explored some print work using her video images

Video Still

Video Still

Video Still

Video Still

Video Still

Video Still

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