iea

Apr 092018

We welcomed the collaborative team of Petra Bachmaier and Sean Gallero, known as Luftwerk from Chicago, IL, for a two week long residency. This was their second time doing a residency with us, and as with their first residency they continued to push the boundaries between moving image and print. They made a series of digital gradient prints on Xuan paper that move when shown with a color changing LED, and a series of polymer plate prints. They were also able to finish 7 hand-bound accordion books, and one laser etched booked.

Barbara Madsen

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Mar 262018

Barbara Madsen is an artist and Associate Professor at Mason Gross School of the Arts. Madsen is known for her work in photography, print, sculpture, and installation. Her vast collections of industrial matter — spark plugs, machine parts, welding masks, light switches, rubber, plastic, prosthetics, artificial eyes, and much more – serve as the stimulus for the work. Her art employs the tropes of modernism, popular culture and objects that are consumed and discarded.Post September 11th, Madsen’s anti-bigotry billboard, “Eye 4 Eye = Blind,” was raised above buildings in Jersey City and “Revenge Never Ends” was pasted behind NJPAC in Newark.  In 2004 she was awarded a Puffin Foundation Fellowship for three banners in Washington D.C. Madsen’s banner of the smiley face with its mouth wide open, like Munch’s scream and gas mask, was hoisted over the façade of the Corcoran Museum of Art at 1661 Pennsylvania Avenue, across the lawn from the White House.

Her solo exhibtions include the New York Public Library, Pratt Institute, Tyler School of Art, Millersville University, St. Lawrence University, Miami University, University of Delaware, Palacky University-CZ, Graficki Collective-Serbia, Scuolal Internazionale di Grafica-Venice, ULUS Gallery-Serbia, Edinburgh Print Gallery-Scotland. Madsen designed the set for Leopold and Loeb at the Lowry Lab Theater in Minneapolis. Madsen has had over 100 national group exhibitions including the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington DC and internatioanlly in Japan, China, Belgium, France, Spain, Serbia, Germany, Poland, India, United Arab Emirates.

Kabi Raj Lama

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Mar 262018

Kabi Raj Lama is an Artist from Kathmandu Nepal. He is known for his large-scale Woodcuts and Lithographic works. As a resident of Boudha and living close to the sacred Boudhanath Stupa, he was inspired by the strong cultural and spiritual environment.  He believes that printing genre matches his creative tendencies, allows his emotions to easily transmit onto chemicals, ink, stone surface and paper. His recent works are bold and independent with brush movements creating raw strokes revealing the swift tendency he has developed in printmaking. He likes the idea of preparing the plates without any plans, not knowing its end result. The scale, speed and colors of these imprinted strokes speak the language of his inner motions. Kabi’s work has been exhibited internationally and he has been an Artist in Residence in Japan, China, Germany.

Feb 042018

Judith is a visiting scholar from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, where she is a candidate for an MPhil degree. Her studio practice deals with memory, and is centered around her families’ ancestral home in Barcelona.

While here Judith archived over 100 family photos and objects using our new Canon 5D R-S DSLR and our large format high-resolution scanner. She turned these into a large series of digital, wood block and fabric prints to be exhibited in Australia and Spain.

Dec 112017

Dave Jones is famous for the work he has done building analog systems for video synthesizing, syncing, and a myriad of other media systems. However, this week he came to do a print residency with us where we began to scan, and catalogue the system diagrams that he uses to build his electronics. Dave then cleaned up the scans and turned them into large format digital prints. Along with his diagrams we also scanned several boxes of historic slides that Dave began to manipulate into stereoscopic prints.

Nov 132017

This week we had Rochester printmaker Adam Werth joining us for a week long residency where he really put our facilities to the test. Adam used his tradition printmaking background and combined it with the new technologies at the IEA to create aquatint plates using a polymer spray on zinc and then engraving the image with our laser. He also spent time creating a large body of new work with our digital printer, and chose to really play with the intense colors that are created from purely digital imagery.

Sep 042017

We were lucky to have Phillip Stearns with us this week. Phillip produces both physical and intangible works, performances, and experiences using electronic media. His practice spans several disciplines from creative coding and physical computing to interactive light and sound installations, computational weaving to performances using light and sound.

During his residency here Phillip experimented with multiple processes including metal patinas that he attempted to etch with our laser cutter.

Here are a few images from his residency, he also did an Instagram takeover to document his process that you can see by following us @alfred_iea.

Quick results with vinegar and different salts. Boric acid is strong stuff!

Combining two projects – Visualizing conflict zones with Z-fighting from “Year of the glitch” and DEM imagery I started working with during my residency at @hsduesseldorf earlier this year.

Sep 022017

The IEA has an Instagram account! Follow us at @alfred_iea to stay posted on current and upcoming artists, events, sneak peeks into our archive, and artist IG takeovers.

Still from processed video

The IEA was joined by Tammy McGovern, of Buffalo, NY, as our artist in residence over the week of June 26th. Tammy, who holds a BA in media study from SUNY Buffalo, has shown her film, video, installation, and interactive works in venues at Hallwalls, Visual Studies Workshop, and the Malaysian Institute of Art, among others. Her interactive works are viewer driven experiences that combine aspects of static collage and cinematic stimulation. Pulling from sources varying from poetic texts to manipulated samples from game shows, Tammy’s work becomes an interactive experiment exploring the grey areas among a viewer’s desires, creations, and readings.

Throughout her week at the IEA, Tammy worked across the image processing tools in the IEA’s video studio to process her own video work and stock video to produce new recordings. The various functions of the Doupfer coupled with the MVIP were used to manipulate the properties of these videos along with the warping and transitional effects of Vizzie software and the 4k mixer. The resulting work comes in the form of colorful, flickering, warping videos which will see future life in Tammy’s web based art works.

Below are images from Tammy residency:

Tammy at helm of video studio

Tammy at helm of video studio

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Still from processed video

Intaglio print

The IEA welcomed Catherine Miller, of Williamsville, NY, as our artist in residence over the week of June 19th. Catherine, who received her MFA in from SUNY Buffalo, focuses on the maze as a symbol in much of her work. Inspired by the challenges foreign refugees face, the maze serves as an analogy to the trials of navigating various bureaucratic systems and legal and personal challenges to reach political asylum in the United States. She works with Mylar for her drawings and, for her print work, constructs etchings with multiple plates consisting of silk collagraphs, solar, carbordum and relief plates. This process of color sequencing and reordering plates produces one of a kind prints that organically produce the maze like designs she explores in her work.

During her residency, Catherine worked across laser etched wood block and acrylic plates, photo polymer, and digital prints to produce works from her maze design series. These varied in size from 12 x 18″ up to 48 x 48″ and on various papers and presses. The stand out were the polymer plate prints, which nearly mirrored the hand drawn quality of the drawings that served as their source material. Catherine brought all of her blocks and plates with her back to WIlliamsville and intends to further work on these prints in the coming months.

Below are images from Catherine’s residency

Laser cut wood blocks and digital printing in progress

Laser cut wood blocks and digital printing in progress

Catherine preparing a photo polymer plate for printing

Catherine preparing a photo polymer plate for printing

Intaglio print

Intaglio print

Relief Print

Relief Print

Photo-polymer print

Photo-polymer print

Digital Print

Digital Print

Digital Print

Digital Print

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