_04A6339

The IEA was joined by Blake Marques Carrington for an artist residency over the week of May 22nd. Based in Brooklyn, NY, Blake holds an MFA from Syracuse University and works across a wide range of media including digital printmaking, audiovisual compositions, live visuals to accompany performances, and video installation user self produced custom software – all falling a heading he calls “Speculative Forensics”. Focusing on the question “can information be lost?” Blake often translates his creations from one medium to another, asking the question of how accurately it could possibly return its original form.

During his residency, Blake spent the majority of his time with the Doupfer synthesizers, creating entirely new works as well as mixing and processing his own tracks through the inputs on these instruments. Blake brought in in own recordings and made new recordings here including making use of a prepared piano which happened to be in the studios. These recordings will be mixed for a new album Blake is currently producing as well as used in future performances and collaborations.

Blake at work in the studio

Blake at work in the studio

“Angels + Noise” 30 second sample (work in progress).

Images from Super-8 tapes being used for Renate's book

The IEA welcomed Renate Ferro as our artist in residence over the week of May 15th. A Professor of Visual Arts at Cornell University, Renate frames herself as a conceptual artist who toggles between the creative skins of old and new technologies. These are actualized through forms such as installation, interactive net-based projects, digital time-based media, drawing, and text. Often engaging with the concepts of memory and disclosure, Renate’s practice conjoins the making of art out of life’s materials and life’s materials out of art, blending the tactile material world with the networked, immaterial world.

During her residency, Renate explored her archive of video work from her Super 8 film and early low-resolution digital video projections, which she had previously experimented with image making from these sources on older technology via printing on various substrates with dot matrix printers. At the IEA she began work on an artist book derived from these images using our large format printers to print on heavy stock Japanese papers. These prints will ultimately become pages of a small edition of books to be stab bound at a later date.

Below is a selection of images from Renate’s time at the IEA.

Renate working with IEA Co-Director Joseph Scheer on new prints

Renate working with IEA Co-Director Joseph Scheer on new prints

Color Tests

Color Tests

Renate speaking with IEA Co-Director Peer Bode about her new series

Renate speaking with IEA Co-Director Peer Bode about her new series

Renate speaking with recent EIA graduate Jessica Earle about her thesis book

Renate speaking with recent EIA graduate Jessica Earle about her thesis book

Images from Super-8 tapes being used for Renate's book

Images from Super-8 tapes being used for Renate's book

Video Still

The IEA hosted Zorica Colić as a resident artist over the week of May 8th, 2017. Zorica’s work researches how contemporary life is structured and manipulated, with particular emphasis on the implications of the biopolitical management of human life. Through various hybridized forms of display, her works explore the complex relationships between politics, art and consumer worlds, examining how our lives are regulated or defined by taste, by products, and by mass-distributed role models. The goal is to identify new ways to subvert normative mass culture in order to re-contextualize images and signs that have become inflated from over-proliferation.

Throughout her residency, Zorica focused on a new series of work spinning off from her series titled Well-beings. In this new series, Zorica shot video as well as still images of different parts of her body while assuming yoga poses. These clips were then cut up, fragmented, and recombined, in a similar manner as Well-beings, to create figures in these poses with various textures derived from other parts of her body with a lean to grotesque textures and forms. Zorica intends to further process this media in her own studio.

Below are images from Zorica’s residency:

Recording Setup

Recording Setup

Zorica working with IEA co-director Joseph Scheer on video images

Zorica working with IEA co-director Joseph Scheer on video images

During her residency Zorica also explored some print work using her video images

During her residency Zorica also explored some print work using her video images

Video Still

Video Still

Video Still

Video Still

Video Still

Video Still

Video display of video work from Snowing in the Bush

The IEA was honored to host Michael Kempson, Nicky Crayson, Jenny Robinson, and Miranda Metcalf for two weeks spanning January and February 2017. The event, Masters of Intaglio with a Touch of Jazz, brought together an international assemblage of master print makers, a gallery director, and jazz singer for a residency filled with presentations and discussions, workshops, and a multi-media performance.

Michael, of Sydney, Australia, and Jenny, of Los Angeles, CA, are master print makers with extensive experience with intaglio print making techniques. In addition to extensive time on their own work, branching out into laser etched woodblock relief printing, both artists held public workshops to share their knowledge of intaglio printmaking and different methodologies they employ, and Michael held a public lecture to speak about his organization, Cicada Press, its founding, and its efforts to reach out to the Aboriginal communities and open up the facilities Cicada Press has to them, while also allowing for collaboration with the students at the University of New South Wales. Both Michael and Jenny currently have their work from their residencies on display, Michael’s show entitled Work and Play at Chung ya Feng Art Center in Beijing (website is in Chinese) and Jenny’s show entitled Constructs at the Davidson Galleries in Seattle, Washington.

Michael and Jenny's collection of laser etched wood blocks they produced and printed

Michael and Jenny's collection of laser etched wood blocks they produced and printed

Michael inking up one of his wood blocks

Michael inking up one of his wood blocks

Koala print and block by Michael

Koala print and block by Michael

Everyone gathered around the offset press with Michael's image

Everyone gathered around the offset press with Michael's image

Koala print by Michael

Koala print by Michael

A day's work

A day's work

(left to right) Michael Kempson, NYSCC professor of Printmaking Myles Calvert, and Nicky Crayson with photo polymer print by Nicky

(left to right) Michael Kempson, NYSCC professor of Printmaking Myles Calvert, and Nicky Crayson with photo polymer print by Nicky

Jenny's plates for a nine plate intaglio print

Jenny's plates for a nine plate intaglio print

Tim working with Jenny on polymer plate prints

Tim working with Jenny on polymer plate prints

Multi-block wood block print by Jenny Robinson

Multi-block wood block print by Jenny Robinson

Joe and Jenny with a nearly complete multi-plate polymer plate print

Joe and Jenny with a nearly complete multi-plate polymer plate print

Jenny held two workshops, one on creating inexpensive, non-tocix, dry point plates for intaglio printing, and another demonstrating her techniques for collé printmaking on fine Japanese and Chinese papers. Michael provided insights on how to produce multiple color intaglio prints with proper registration, allowing for CMYK processes which can be difficult to do for beginning print makers.

Inexpensive dry-point demo

Inexpensive dry-point demo

Jenny demonstrating the cutting techniques for the inexpensive dry point plates. This technique utilizes stiff paperboard and polyacrylic finish as a plate in lieu of more expensive ant toxic materials.

Jenny demonstrating the cutting techniques for the inexpensive dry point plates. This technique utilizes stiff paperboard and polyacrylic finish as a plate in lieu of more expensive ant toxic materials.

Jenny inking a dry point plate

Jenny inking a dry point plate

An inked plate by Jenny

An inked plate by Jenny

Paperboard plate and finished print

Paperboard plate and finished print

Completed non-toxic, inexpensive dry-point intaglio print

Completed non-toxic, inexpensive dry-point intaglio print

Jenny giving her demonstration on collé printing on Japanese and Chinese papers

Jenny giving her demonstration on collé printing on Japanese and Chinese papers

A small scale demonstration of collé printing with fine papers

A small scale demonstration of collé printing with fine papers

A larger scale demonstration of collé printing on Japanese and Chinese papers. NYSCC print technician Tim Pauszek assists Jenny with her demonstration

A larger scale demonstration of collé printing on Japanese and Chinese papers. NYSCC print technician Tim Pauszek assists Jenny with her demonstration

A larger scale demonstration of collé printing on Japanese and Chinese papers. NYSCC print technician Tim Pauszek assists Jenny with her demonstration

A larger scale demonstration of collé printing on Japanese and Chinese papers. NYSCC print technician Tim Pauszek assists Jenny with her demonstration

MIchael's demonstration on multiple plate registration for intaglio printing

MIchael's demonstration on multiple plate registration for intaglio printing

Plates for three color process

Plates for three color process

Process for multiple plate printing. Along with a good registration sheet, the secret is to keep the paper firmly clamped under the rollers until all colors have been printed.

Process for multiple plate printing. Along with a good registration sheet, the secret is to keep the paper firmly clamped under the rollers until all colors have been printed.

A student examining a completed print.

A student examining a completed print.

In addition to Jenny and Michael’s presentations and demonstrations, Nicky Crayson and Miranda Metcalf also presented held events throughout the period of the event. Miranda, the curator of contemporary prints at Davidson Galleries in Seattle, WA, hosted a talk, titled Being Prepared – What to do before Approaching Galleries, in which she spoke about what artists need to prepare before approaching galleries with artwork and how to present their work in a professional environment after leaving school. She also met with students individually to speak with them about their work and how they could make themselves more likely to successfully get gallery representation.

Nicky, a jazz singer from Sydney, Australia, collaborated with NYSCC Electronic Integrated Arts MFA students Matthew Underwood and Jesse Earle, along with musicians Daisy Wu and Ken Maracek to put on Snowing in the Bush, a multi-media performance which involved improvised musical performances between Nicky, Daisy, and Ken, and a final crescendo with Matthew and Jessica contributing with electronic instruments and processing the sound based on a score Matt put together. All of the while there were multiple monitors and projectors with video work by Matt which used images from Michael’s prints as a basis and was processed in real time by the sound produced during the performance. This video work was displayed on monitors after the performance in the Harland Snodgrass Multi-Media Gallery.

(left to right) Daisy Wu, NYSCC professor of sonic art Andrew Deutsch, Nicky Crayson, and Matthew Underwood meeting in the sonic arts studio

(left to right) Daisy Wu, NYSCC professor of sonic art Andrew Deutsch, Nicky Crayson, and Matthew Underwood meeting in the sonic arts studio

Matthew showing Nicky some of the tools he would later use during the performance

Matthew showing Nicky some of the tools he would later use during the performance

Show card for Snowing in the Bush

Show card for Snowing in the Bush

Photo from the Snowing in the Bush performance

Photo from the Snowing in the Bush performance

Photo from the Snowing in the Bush performance

Photo from the Snowing in the Bush performance

Video display of video work from Snowing in the Bush

Video display of video work from Snowing in the Bush

To conclude the event, Michael, Nicky, Jenny, and Miranda were joined by New York State artist and recent IEA resident artist Cassandra Hooper for a presentation or their work and discussion on their working practices, inspirations, their residencies, and the current world of contemporary print practice. This presentation, as well as Michael and Miranda’s talks, can be viewed on the AU Division of Expanded Media’s YouTube page.

Rolling an offset woodblock print

Rolling an offset woodblock print

Close-up of silkscreen printing over polymer-plate print

The IEA was delighted to host Chad Latz as our artist in residence over the week of April 3rd, 2017. Chad, who received his art degree from the NYSCC at Alfred University, is the chief innovation officer a the Cohn & Wolfe design film. Chad has spent more than 17 years in the agency world developing award-winning, integrated marketing and communications strategies for some of the most respected, admired and engaged brands. He was recognized in 2010 as one of PRWeek’s 40 under 40 and his insightful perspectives on digital and social media are frequently highlighted in industry publications and at international events and conferences. Outside of Cohn & Wolfe, Chad spends much of his time in his cabin in the Catskills working on personal art projects ranging from print media to printmaking.

During his time at the IEA, Chad worked across our print media facilities combining multiple processes into each of his images. The inspiration for his prints came from photos and documents that belonged to his grandfather, a principle art director and one of the founders of Esquire magazine, whom Chad never met. Additionally, to further pursue his family history, Chad participated in a 23andMe analysis and took a course in bio-engineering to sequence his genealogy back 500 generations. The data, charts, and graphs from these tests were combined with the photos of his grandfather, overlaying screen-printing on photo-polymer prints and burning text into digital prints, to create prints as layered as his genealogy.

Below are images from Chad’s residency:

Chad (right) and IEA technician and master print maker Tim Pauszek pressing a polymer plate print

Chad (right) and IEA technician and master print maker Tim Pauszek pressing a polymer plate print

Polymer plate layout

Polymer plate layout

Completed polymer plate prints with silkscreen overlay

Completed polymer plate prints with silkscreen overlay

Chad hspeaking with students about his project and process

Chad speaking with students about his project and process

Chad with completed print

Chad with completed print

Close-up of silkscreen printing over polymer-plate print

Close-up of silkscreen printing over polymer-plate print

Still from video

The IEA was joined by Heejin Jang, from New York City, over the week of April 10th, 2017. Heejin received her MFA in painting at Kookmin University in Seoul, South Korea in 2011 and an MFA in New Genres at the San Francisco Art Institute in 2013. Her work manifests itself in the forms of experimental video art and live performance. Distorting ambient field recordings and found footage from the Internet, Heejin creates reverberating forces that gets one lost in the echoes of invisible itineraries to the outer world.

During her time at the IEA, Heejin spent much of her time in our time media studios gathering new resources for her work. In particular, Heejin processed a lot of recordings from her library and live video through the MVIP and edited these compositions through the Panisonic 4K mixer. A duckling also made a cameo in her recordings. Heejin was able to put together a single channel piece with the work she recorded here and plans to use the raw recordings in future work.

Below are some images from her residency:

Still from video

Still from video

Still from video

Still from video

Still from video

Still from video

Still from video

Still from video

Two layered print with images by Scott and Lee (note: print appears wavy because it was photographed while still wet)

The IEA welcomed Scott Stevens, Lee Somers, and Elisabeth Pellathy for a residency over the week of March 27th. Scott, Professor of Printmaking at the University of Montevallo, Lee, Professor of Three Dimensional Design at the University of Montevallo, and Elisabeth, Professor of New Media at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, came together to collaborate on a project centered around Alabama’s Cahaba River, a free flowing river that connects Birmingham to Montevallo and contains some of the greatest biodiversity and historic significance in the South. The primary themes of interest in the Cahaba River centered around the natural environment, the human history that stretched from the Civil War to the Civil Rights movement and beyond, and its ecological and geological features that fed local economies, such as coal, limestone, and iron ore that were key components to the foundation of the iron industry in the area.

Throughout their residency Scott, Lee, and Elisabeth collaborated on laser etched acrylic plates which could then be used for both relief and intaglio printing. Each produced images from their own research on the Cahaba River and layered their images on top of each other to produce a series of prints. Each print contained multiple layers of the history and environmental features of the watershed and the hand of each artist, with photographic, CAD generated, and images from 3D models contributing to each piece. Additionally, a presentation and discussion was held where each artist spoke about their artistic backgrounds and work, how they came together to collaborate on this project, and their research they did to contribute to the Cahaba River Watershed Project.

Below is a sample of photos from their residency:

(L to R) Lee, Scott, and Elisabeth prepping plates for printing

(L to R) Lee, Scott, and Elisabeth prepping plates for printing

Pressing second pass of layered print

Pressing second pass of layered print

Discussing print with IEA co-director Joseph Scheer (second from left)

Discussing print with IEA co-director Joseph Scheer (second from left)

Lee and Elisabeth inking plate for intaglio printing

Lee and Elisabeth inking plate for intaglio printing

Evaluating an intaglio with Elisabeth's image

Evaluating an intaglio with Elisabeth's image

Elisabeth wiping a recently printed plate

Elisabeth wiping a recently printed plate

Two layered print with images by Scott and Elisabeth (note: print appears wavy because it was photographed while still wet)

Two layered print with images by Scott and Elisabeth (note: print appears wavy because it was photographed while still wet)

Two layered print with images by Scott and Lee (note: print appears wavy because it was photographed while still wet)

Two layered print with images by Scott and Lee (note: print appears wavy because it was photographed while still wet)

Three layered print with images by Scott, Elisabeth, and Lee (note: print appears wavy because it was photographed while still wet)

Three layered print with images by Scott, Elisabeth, and Lee (note: print appears wavy because it was photographed while still wet)

Sequence 01.00_07_21_19.Still001

The IEA was joined by Ray Ferreira of Brooklyn, NY, for an artist residency over the week of March 13th. Ray, who received his MFA from Hunter College in 2016, uses Englishes, Spanishes, and body languages to explore ways, which his body is manifested and manifests worlds, and ways his body aims to create a different ontoepistoethics. He views his texts as modular, pieces coming into and out of existence, stretching across spaces, times, and matters.

Throughout his residency Ray split his time between recording sound and video and putting together a layered composition of processed video and audio recordings. Ray melded together video he shot of the snowy weather conditions experienced during his residency (which was enough to close the University for one day) with hand gestures and shadow play with spoken word processed audio to produce a piece that touches upon themes of loss and memory. Ray also produced a small series of digital prints from past and present work.

Below are images from Ray’s residency:

Still from Video Work

Still from Video Work

Still from Video Work

Still from Video Work

Digital Print

Digital Print

Digital Print

Digital Print

Digital Print

Digital Print

_04A5523

The IEA welcomed Laura Splan, of Brooklyn, NY, for a residency over the week of February 20th, 2017. Laura, an alum of Mills College in Oakland, CA, explores the intersections of art, science, technology, and craft who explores the material manifestations of our mutable relationship with the human body. Much of her work is inspired by experimentation with materials and processes (blood, cosmetic facial peel, digital fabrication), which she mines for their narrative implications and untapped potentials. Her recent work uses biosensors (electromyography, electroencephalography) to create data-driven forms and patterns for digitally fabricated sculptures, tapestries and works on paper.

During her week at the IEA, Laura focused on creating 4K digital animations derived from bio-metric data, specifically EMGs and EEGs. These took the form of colored, moving lines that starts out with only a few onscreen and gradually amassing to the point where only tiny movements can be seen if one looks close enough. These animations were created by entering the bio-data into code created in Processing which read it into animation files that would sometimes take up to seven hours to render a 30 second clip. Laura also composed a three channel animation that spanned across the three 4K displays in the TSI/Harland Snodgrass Gallery and gave a small, informal presentation to Professor Barbara Lattanzi’s Interactive Media class.

Below are some images from Laura’s residency:

Laura Splan editing animation.

Laura Splan editing animation.

Animation on Three-Channel 4K display

Animation on Three-Channel 4K display

Presentation to Interactive Media Class

Presentation to Interactive Media Class

wetwavy1

IEA artist Sondra Perry will be holding a solo show, titled flesh out, at Squeaky Wheel Film and Media Arts Center in Buffalo, NY, from January 20th – April 1st. Additionally, the will be an opening event from 6:00-9:00 pm on the 20th with an artist talk at 7:30 pm.

The five works included in this exhibition of work by Sondra Perry are critical investigations into the way digital technology gives shape and encompasses representation. If you will be in the Buffalo area make a point to visit Squeaky Wheel to see flesh out and all of the other great work and exhibitions that take place there.

Wet and Wavy Looks—Typhon coming on (2016)

Wet and Wavy Looks—Typhon coming on (2016)

© 2010 iea Suffusion WordPress theme by Sayontan Sinha