As The Air Moves Back From You

The IEA was proud to support the performance-installation As The Air Moves Back From You, which took place in the Fosdick-Nelson Gallery of the School of Art and Design of the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. Created by D. Chase Angier in collaboration with Petra Bachmaier and Sean Gallero of Luftwerk, the Tiffany Mills Company, Kristi Spessard, Laurel Jay Carpenter, Andrew Deutsch, John Laprade, and Markéta Fantová, As The Air Moves Back From You represents a big collaborative effort involving elaborate dance and performance works, several different musical and sound compositions, and intricate projection mapping all interweaving with 8,000 pounds of rice, all shifting and changing throughout the five week duration of the show.

Luftwerk and Chase started to develop this piece with the IEA’s help in the spring of 2014 where tests of rice formations and projection mapping. Many hours were poured into this piece by all parties and the result shows the extent of everyone’s hard work.

During their time here in January, Luftwerk also took the time to make prints on transparency to test Degrees of Lightness for a show they participated in February, Invisible, at The Glass Curtain Gallery of Columbia College, Chicago.

Below are a set of images of the setup and performance of As The Air Moves Back From You and documentation of Luftwerk’s experiments at the IEA.

Setup, Photo by Yasmina Chavez

Setup, Photo by Yasmina Chavez

Setup, Photo by Yasmina Chavez

Artist Talk by Luftwerk, Photo by Yasmina Chavez

As The Air Moves Back From You

As The Air Moves Back From You, Projection on Rice

As The Air Moves Back From You, Photo by Yasmina Chavez

As The Air Moves Back From You, Photo by Yasmina Chavez

As The Air Moves Back From You, Photo by Yasmina Chavez

Luftwerk experimenting with projection through transparency

Projection through transparency experiment

Degrees of Lightness

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